The U.S. EPA recently released the 15th installment of its Preliminary Effluent Guidelines Program Plan[1]. In addition to announcing the initiation of new rulemakings for certain categories of industrial dischargers, the report provides a window into where the agency is focusing its attention for potential future clean water act regulations. This year,

The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (VDEC) is currently in the process of reviewing and reauthorizing its Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Mixed among the updates is a proposed provision that should be of great concern to generators of used oil wastewater. Section 7-805 of VDEC’s hazardous waste regulations delineates the requirements for wastewater to

EPA recently issued an Enforcement Alert to owners and operators of metal recycling facilities about high levels of VOC emissions that have been identified at a number of large shredders.  The issue of VOC emissions from metal shredders has not previously been well known or understood.  EPA is now publicly acknowledging the issue and, finally,

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) recently announced that it will be extending its COVID-19 Implications for Signing Paper Hazardous Waste Manifests policy (“Temporary COVID-19 Manifest Signature Policy” or “Policy”) until November 30, 2020.

On May 18, 2020, EPA issued its Temporary COVID-19 Manifest Signature Policy concerning how handlers of hazardous waste can address generator

The regulation of PFAS substances has become a matter of contention between U.S. EPA, states and local governments, environmental groups, and industry participants. EPA is under pressure by health experts, environmental groups, and affected communities to set a Maximum Containment Level (“MCL”) for PFAS, but has yet to do so. States, however, are beginning to

The ink is barely dry on the reclassification of the Chicago ozone nonattainment area from moderate to serious, under the 2008 ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) intends to seek redesignation to attainment.  According to IEPA staff, the agency has data supporting a request for redesignation to

No Further Remediation Letters have become an established part of the regulatory landscape. These letters serve many purposes, including reducing uncertainty over future clean-up obligations and signifying that the property is “clean enough” for development. But the process can take time, which in some instances delays transactions and increases cost.

To address these delays, the

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday stated that it would review a case filed by property owners in Montana state court seeking restoration damages that were beyond the clean-up activities required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA).  In the case, Atlantic Richfield Co. v.